Gear Production

DEC 2015

Gear Production

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December 2015—19 and peeling coatings. An ideal solution would also compensate automatically for the changes in tool geometry generated by each resharpening. Digital Diagnostics A number of attempts have been made to adapt standard process monitoring systems to hobbing operations, but none have been completely successful. Still, the need exists. So Artis (a Marposs company, Auburn Hills, Mich.), worked consumption, and several other parameters. System software uses those inputs to create an exact signature of each cutting operation and generate a good tolerance band on each side of the signature. Subsequent operations are then compared with the master signature and allowed to continue as long as all of the monitored parameters fall within the tolerance band. Signature analysis is a proven technology. What sets the Artis hobbing solution apart is the fact that the software is optimized to detect the exact anomalies produced by worn and damaged hobbing tools. The system is based on data collected on production machines that experienced normal wear, welded chips, peeling coatings and broken teeth, each of which generated a distinct signature captured and built into the software. The availability of real-world data also enabled the developers to include algorithms to detect and compensate for tool diameter changes caused by resharpening. Since a modern hobbing tool may be resharpened up to 15 times, this capability is critical in a successful process monitoring solution. In practice, this means an optimum process signature for a resharpened tool can be calculated without remastering the The Artis CTM V6 is the latest generation of the company's tool, machine and process monitoring solution. "Signature analysis is a proven technology. What sets the Artis hobbing solution apart is the fact that the software is optimized to detect the exact anomalies produced by worn and damaged hobbing tools." with a major transmission builder to develop a hobbing-specifc monitoring system that would maximize output and tool life simultaneously. The resulting system uses sensorless monitoring of torque data and machine-mounted sensors to monitor spindle vibration, power

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